Medical Conditions


Illness

Children who become unwell during the day are looked after by a qualified First Aider, until they have recovered sufficiently to return to their class or are collected by parents.

All accidents are reported to the School Office; minor cuts, scrapes and bruises we can deal with but for an injury of a more serious nature, or if your child is unwell, we will try to contact you by telephone.  Therefore, please ensure we have your up-to-date home telephone number, mobile number or work number.  Please also remember that children are not allowed to travel home alone during school hours - they must be collected from the School Office.

When children are feeling unwell it is a stressful time for both the child and parents.  While school attendance is important your child's well-being takes priority.  If your child is ill and unable to come to school, please telephone the School Office as soon as possible to explain the reason for their absence.

Some illnesses do not require obligatory absence from school as they are not contagious.  However, the best place for a child who is feeling ill is at home.  Children often want to return to school before they are completely well and as a result often end up being sent home half way through the day.  Please ensure that your child is well enough before allowing them to return to school.

If your child has been sick or has diarrhoea we have been advised that they should not return to school until they have been clear for 48 hours. 

If your child has a contagious condition such as Chicken Pox, Impetigo or Measles he or she must be kept at home until the rash / spots are dry. 

Other contagious conditions can be looked up on the Internet or please contact the School Office for advice. 

In the case of Slapped Cheek Syndrome the child must be feeling completely well before returning to school. 

The link below gives examples of how long children should remain at home following illnesses.

The link is: http://www.publichealth.hscni.net/sites/default/files/A2%20Schools%20poster_1.pdf

 In the case of conjunctivitis we are aware that there are differing opinions regarding when it is safe to return to school.  This condition can often be uncomfortable and distressing for a child so we ask parents to keep their child at home until the irritation is over.

If you are in any doubt as to whether your child should stay away from school, or when they should return, please contact the School Office for advice.

Hand Washing Guidance

The most effective way of reducing the spread of illnesses is through good hand hygiene.

Parents play the biggest role in influencing their children in their hand washing habits. Washing your hands, aside from vaccination, is probably the most effective contribution you can make as a parent to reducing the spread of infection. Regular hand washing, especially after going to the toilet or during an illness (especially, cold, flu, vomiting and diarrhoea) will help prevent the spread of infection.

Bugs (microbes), such as bacteria and viruses, can easily be spread by touch. These may be picked up from contaminated surfaces, objects or people and then passed on to others.

Bar soap should be avoided as slimy soap harbours germs. Washing your hands with hot water and liquid soap for the time it takes to sing a verse of “Happy Birthday” should ensure that any germs are destroyed.

Encourage children to wash their hands by showing them how to do it, and by setting them a good example.

Wash your hands before you

  • Prepare or eat food
  • Treat a cut or a wound
  • Visit a hospital ward (remember alcohol-based hand rubs are also provided)

Wash your hands after you

  • Use the toilet
  • Handle uncooked foods, particularly raw meat, poultry or fish
  • Blow your nose, cough or sneeze
  • Touch animals or animal waste
  • Take out/handle rubbish
  • Change a nappy
  • Work/play in the garden
  • Touch a sick or injured person
  • Visit a hospital ward (remember alcohol-based hand rubs are also provided)

The #1 way to prevent the spread of infections is proper hand washing!

NHS guidance on hand washing

NHS Hand Wash Poster
Updated: 19/09/2017 596 KB